Here are the Best Saltwater Fish for a 75 Gallon Tank

So, as a 75 gallon aquarium owner, you can now add all of the smaller species of saltwater fish to your tank, as well as unlock some medium and larger fish types.

75 Gallon Aquarium Dimensions

The most common dimensions of a 75 gallon tank are typically 48" long x 18" wide x 21" deep (121 cm x 46 cm x 53 cm). Below is a graphic summarizing the most common aquarium dimensions.

Additionally, the weight of a 75 gallon fish tank is 140 lbs (63.5 kg) when empty and 850 lbs (385.5 kg) when filled up.

If you are someone who enjoys a fine array of bright colors and unique patterns, then, having the freedom of a 75 gallon aquarium is perfect for you.

75 Gallon Aquarium Equipment

Before you even consider what fish should inhabit your 75-gallon fish tank, you need to acquire and fit the equipment required to keep them all healthy and alive!

So, here is a quick checklist that you should use as a reference when acquiring your aquarium equipment:

  • A heater, preferably 300 watts, but 250 watts is also fine.
  • A protein skimmer.
  • Reef tank aquarium lights.
  • A fish tank lid as some of the fish on this list are jumpers!
  • Test kits.
  • Powerhead for water flow.

Top 5 Saltwater Fish Species for a 75 Gallon Aquarium List

Below is a list consisting of the top 5 saltwater fish for a 75 gallon aquarium, including a description of each fish and how many you can house in your fish tank.

1. Tangs

With the larger-sized aquarium, you can now house many different types of tangs, ranging in size, coloration, and behavior. Yellow, Kole, Tomini, Two-spot Bristletooth, and Square Bristletooth tangs are all fantastic options for this aquarium.

All of the tangs listed above are compatible with the other saltwater fish that are mentioned in this list too, you should only keep one type of tang in a 75 gallon tank though. This is due to their sizes and also aggressiveness toward their own.

2. Dwarf Angelfish

Flame, Coral Beauty, Bi-Color, Pygmy, Flameback, Lemonpeel, Rusty, and Red Stripe dwarf angelfish are all more than compatible with a 75-gallon fish tank. They are peaceful fish that are incredibly easy on the eye and will provide you with much entertainment.

You should only keep one from this species though, as they do not play well with their own kind and there simply isn't enough space to house multiple. Don't worry, they are model citizens with other saltwater fish, and the rest of the fish appearing on this list.

3. Cleaner Goby

Neon, Yellow line, Shark nose, and Hybrid gobies are the best choices for your 75-gallon fish tank, as far as cleaner gobies are concerned. All of the subspecies mentioned are brilliantly compatible with large reef tank fish communities, providing much-needed support when it comes to removing unwanted parasites and maintaining a clean tank.

Unfortunately, they do not play well with their own. So, keeping one cleaner goby per 75 gallon tank is your only option. They do get along well with most other fish species, especially the ones mentioned here, so, for the most part, compatibility won't be an issue.

4. Dwarf Lionfish

Lionfish are certainly unique and pretty awesome visually, but what many people don't see is their charming and endearing personalities that shine through when they reside in big spacious tanks, brimming with life and vibrant colors. Fuzzy dwarf, Dwarf zebra, Fu Manchu, and Mombasa lionfish are all perfect for this size aquarium.

Something to keep in mind is that they are predatory fish, and therefore will make light work of small tank mates and invertebrates if you are not careful. They do, however, live in harmony with the fish that appear on this list and previous saltwater fish lists we have covered. You should keep one per tank as they can be territorial and aggressive toward their own.

5. Chromis Fish

Blue-green or Blue Reef Chromis are two beautiful subspecies of Chromis fish that are compatible with the larger 75 gallon fish tank. They are comparatively easy to look after and share incredibly laid-back personalities, which is great for a reef community tank.

They get along with their own too (which is pretty rare), meaning that, due to their smaller size, you can keep between 1 and 5 in a 75 gallon aquarium. Being active swimmers, you will be entertained for hours watching them dart around, and their coloration is simply breathtaking.

Other Saltwater Fish

Something to bear in mind is that there are literally hundreds of brilliant saltwater fish that are more than compatible with a 75-gallon fish tank. So, if you have not found a fish that you like on this list, take a look at some of our other fish lists for more inspiration.

Also, if a 75-gallon aquarium is an unrealistic size for you, below are some good sized-aquarium fish lists for you too:

Saltwater fish for a 20-gallon tank.

Saltwater fish for a 30-gallon tank.

Saltwater fish for a 40-gallon tank.

Saltwater fish for a 55-gallon tank.

Saltwater fish for a 65-gallon tank.

Saltwater fish for a 90-gallon tank.

Additionally, out of the fish that you see on the list, you are probably wondering how many you can keep in total in your 75-gallon tank.

Well, you should be keeping a maximum of 20 fish in a 75-gallon aquarium, however, we recommend between 10 and 14 to reduce maintenance and also allow you to give more attention to your fish, which will typically lead to them living a longer and happier life.

75 Gallon Saltwater Fish Downloadable PDF

We understand that it might be a difficult task to remember all of the fish species that we have listed above. So, we have created a free and helpful downloadable PDF for you to download or print out as a reference for the fish that we have mentioned in this article.

Not only are the fish listed with photos, but their requirements and care levels have all been listed too. So, check it out below!

Conclusion

The fish that appear on this list are all fantastic and brilliantly compatible with a 75-gallon tank or larger. Something to keep in mind is their compatibility with their own, most of these fish do not play well with each other, therefore it is important to read how many we say to keep. Additionally, if you wanted to add some non-fish to your aquarium, by all means, do so, there are some awesome shrimp colonies you can introduce and you could even add a moray eel if you were feeling brave!